English

The English program reflects the belief that all students will participate in the literary community. During the four years here, students learn to read, write, speak, and listen for social interaction, personal response, information and understanding, as well as critical analysis. These are goals defined by the New York State Learning Standards.

Students in all classes will prepare for the Common Core English Language Arts Regents Examination, given at the end of English 11. At each level, students will complete a large number of projects for informational, critical, literary, and social purposes. There will be practice in reading, writing, speaking and listening for all students.

English 9

One (1) year; One (1) credit

Students in this course will read a variety of works from realistic, present-day novels to Shakespeare’s classics. All works will connect through a common theme of survival. One goal of the course is to expose students to a wide range of fiction and nonfiction materials. Students will examine a variety of “close reading” strategies with all texts. Students will complete a number of writing assignments that focus on the development of the body paragraph, as well as argument writing. In order to complete these tasks, students will be reading, writing, speaking and listening on a regular basis. All students complete a large-scale research project to end the year in which they write a formally documented MLA research paper and present an oral report of their findings to their peers.

Advanced English 9 by contract

Students taking Regents English can earn the advanced designation and the weighted credit by meeting the following criteria, in addition to the required classroom assignments:

  1. Maintain an 85 average for each quarter.
  2. Completion of a summer assignment.
  3. Research and complete 8 current events.
  4. Read and complete 4 independent novel studies.

In achieving advanced English credit, students will be asked to complete assignments that will allow them to make insightful connections to themselves and the Global Studies curriculum.

English 10

One (1) year; One (1) credit

This course involves the reading and study of classic world literature, both through in class and outside independent reading assignments. Writing instruction includes literary interpretation, literary style analysis, persuasive/argumentative writing, and the research process (including MLA format). Grammar and English usage skills are integrated with writing instruction.

Vocabulary study includes vocabulary in the context of the literature.

English 10A

One (1) year; One (1) credit

Prerequisites: test scores, report card grades

This course covers literature, non-fiction, and poetry from the seventeenth century to the twentieth century over the span of one school year. Students will partake in “close readings” of the literature in order to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of the authors, their works, and their messages. Students should be prepared for extensive reading and writing, including in- class timed writings, journal entries, research projects, and formal essays. Students should expect to have a reading and/or writing assignment due each day.

English 11

One (1) year; One (1) credit

English 11 is a full year course that focuses on the skills necessary to be prepared for the college entrance exams, the Common Core ELA Test and the world ahead whether you are career or college bound. Students will be expected to do outside reading and writing, make presentations to the class, participate in class and small group activities, be organized and responsible, and maintain a diligent work schedule in order to prepare for the demands of college/university work.

CHS provides students with a traditional education based on the academically rigorous study of classic literature, history, and the arts. The curriculum recognizes the developmental stages of the student while creating life-long learners and virtuous citizens. Students study the classics (novels, essays, plays, poems, etc.) in conjunction with the historical time period of which they are studying.

Objectives:

  • To read, write, listen, and speak critically
  • To study and explore American literature and its various authors
  • To prepare for the English Regents in June
  • To prepare students to gather information relevant to the college option and career/work option
  • To meet the challenges of the NYS learning standards for English/Language Arts

English 11A

One (1) year; One (1) credit

Prerequisites: test scores, report card grades, and summer assignment

In English 11A, students will be a part of a community of readers and writers. It is an intense course with an emphasis on American Literature. This course covers literature from the seventeenth century to the twentieth century using various genres over the span of two semesters. Students will partake in “close readings” of the literature in order to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of the authors, their works, their messages, and most importantly their writing style. Students should be prepared not only for extensive reading but extensive writing as well during in-class timed writings, journal entries, creative writing projects, and formal essays. Students should expect to have a reading and/or writing assignment due each day. Students should be ready to engage in Socratic discussions regarding arguable, thought-provoking questions, which will lead to further inquiry to discover the deeper meaning of each unit (Jonker).

CHS provides students with a traditional education based on the academically rigorous study of classic literature, history, and the arts. The curriculum recognizes the developmental stages of the student while creating life-long learners and virtuous citizens. Students study the classics (novels, essays, plays, poems, etc.) in conjunction with the historical time period of which they are studying.

Objectives: Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Develop and support an argument using several sources
  • Recognize and explain the elements of both novels and short stories
  • Explain elements and characteristics of American literature from the Native American period to the Post-Modern/contemporary period
  • Recognize an author’s style through use of techniques such as: diction, satire, paradox, irony, theme, etc.
  • Correctly cite information from multiple sources

Jonker. “English 11: American Literature and Composition.” English 11: American Literature and Composition. N.p., 2013. Web. 22 Dec. 2015.

English 12

One (1) Year; One (1) Credit

Students in this course will read works such as Beowulf and The Things They Carried. Students will complete a large number of projects for informational, literary, critical and social purposes. In order to complete these projects students will be reading, writing, speaking and listening. All students complete a large-scale research project and present their findings in a properly documented paper and electronic presentation.

AP English

One (1) year; One (1) credit

(ADVANCED PLACEMENT)

Prerequisites: English 10A and/or 11A, Summer Writing Project

Final Exams:  National AP exam & local

In AP English, students will be a part of a community of readers and writers, of and about stories, poems, articles, novels, and plays. Students will work on your own, in small groups, and with the whole class in developing interpretations of literary works.  Students will use a variety of approaches to literary criticism –psychological, sociological, effective, formalist, and more — and from them, students will fashion their own approach.

Student writings will include interpretations, stories, responses to texts, poems, dialogues, sketches, projections, and responses to exam questions. As a speaker, students will be presenting their ideas in the discussion every day. Other activities will include reading works aloud, presenting interpretations, role-playing, debating, and working in a writing group.

Besides earning high school credit, students can earn advanced college placement or credit by achieving a high enough score on the National Advanced Placement Exam in Literature and Composition, a three-hour test given in May.

Sports writing and Literature

Half (1/2) year; Half (1/2) credit

Prerequisites: English 9

An elective designed for upperclassmen to study the use of sports in literature as well as analyzing and composing written works on the topic of sports. Students will read various short stories, novels and magazine/news articles, as well as write their opinions about several themes. Themes studied will include leadership and character, current trends, rivalries, definitions of success and failure, jinxes and fate, heroes, coaching ethics, etc. Those taking this class should have an interest in both athletics and literature.

Speech and Debate

Half (1/2) year; Half (1/2) credit

Students learn how to use oral skills effectively in formal and informal situations. Students learn such skills as logic and reasoning, the organization of thought and supporting materials, and effective presentation of one’s voice and body. This course will introduce students to numerous public speaking situations, and they learn the methods, aims, and styles(e.g., Lincoln-Douglas debate, expository speaking, improvisational speaking, original oratory, radio broadcast, oral interpretation, and dramatic interpretation).

Communications and Media

One (1) year; One (1) credit

A major focus is the study of media and mass communication in relation to culture and society. The class provides students with the ability to analyze the institutions, forms, and content of media. It is a year-long course that serves as an introduction to the major approaches, theories, and perspectives in the study of communications and media. The class will focus on intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, and organizational communication. The class will also explore how media issues like presentation, ideology, economic influence, and audience reception affect these communication perspectives.

The following will covered and evaluated in this class and in this order:

  • Inspiration
  • Ethics and History
  • 1st Amendment, Censorship, Libel, and Copyright Law
  • Ethical writing
  • News History (Field Trip to station or paper)
  • The parts of a newspaper
  • The Interview
  • The Creation of The Paw Print
  • Video and editing
  • Visual Media Publication